Coverage Matters

We began to really make an effort to cover everyone in our 2011 yearbook. Even on the first page, we got lots of people!

We began to really make an effort to cover everyone in our 2011 yearbook. Even on the first page, we got lots of people!

A few years back, a yearbook adviser contacted me about her concerns about being able to pay her bill at the end of the year. It seems that, with just a few weeks to go, she still had quite a lot of money she has to raise. “How much?” I asked. “Oh, about $8,000,” she answered.

Wait, what?

As a yearbook adviser for 15 years, there have been some tough years, but NEVER should you get within weeks of the end of the year with that much debt to tackle.

There are a million ways to be successful with your yearbook marketing. I’m a firm believer in NOT doing any fundraiser that does not directly relate to the class objectives. In other words, no candy sales, bake sales or car washes. Just book sales, ad sales and photography.

But the very BEST advice I offer that should guarantee financial success is one I came to understand as our school population began to grow:

You must cover EVERYONE in that yearbook.

Over the 15 years I’ve advised, our school has grown from about 850 students to 1500 and then back down to 1100.

When I first started advising, digital photography had not yet taken the world by storm. If a student wanted to remember the school year, that student needed a yearbook. Somehow we managed to get just about everybody into the book without even trying. I guess it’s not that hard with 850 students and 200-some pages. Do the math. That’s just four or five students per page.

We attempted to get one "group"-type image on each page.

We attempted to get one “group”-type image on each page.

Our tough lesson came not with the post 9/11 economic collapse, but after a bookkeeping incident wiped out our coffers in 2005. Suddenly we were struggling to make ends meet. Had we not had the issue with the bookkeeper, we would have had a nice little nest egg to cushion us and we might not have noticed…

These pages were not winners when it came to design, but we sure managed to get a lot of people on them, and that's what sells yearbooks.

These pages were not winners when it came to design, but we sure managed to get a lot of people on them, and that’s what sells yearbooks.

As our school grew, our coverage was not improving. Suddenly, we had over 1,000 students, but we were selling fewer books.

It took time for me to change my opinion on how we should do things. But then I realized if we did not change, we would fail!

My old opinion was that students should join clubs and plays sports. If they would only get involved, then they would get into those pages.

My new opinion is that some students are not ever going to join anything at school, but we have to find a way to include them anyway.

If we fail to include everyone, then how can we expect everyone to want a yearbook?

How do you get everyone in the book? Well, trust me, there will be those who make a huge effort to remain anonymous. However, most students are just wishing your yearbook staff will make the effort.

Even our opening pages had lots of people on them.

Even our opening pages had lots of people on them.

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